Seminar on Oklahoma’s Glass Mountains

Earlier this week I gave a seminar to the Entomology Group of the Webster Groves Nature Study Society. Founded in 1920 and known locally as “WGNSS”, the organization seeks “to stimulate interest in nature study on the part of adults and children, to cooperate with other organizations in nature study, and to encourage amateur research in the natural science.” I’ve been an active member in the society’s Entomology Group since the early 1980s, and for almost five years now I have also served as editor for the society’s newsletter, Nature Notes (see this archive of recent issues). Occasionally they invite me to talk—sometimes to just the Entomology Group and other times to the Society as a whole—about my entomological exploits. This time I chose to focus on my several visits to the Glass Mountains in northwestern Oklahoma over the past few years, which readers of this blog may remember has been the source of an inordinate number of new state records and other significant finds for the beetles I study. The presentation provided an overview of the insects I’ve encountered during these visits, and for those who might be interested a PDF version of the presentation is posted here. 

Natural History of Oklahoma’s Glass Mountains…

Copyright © Ted C. MacRae 2014

About Ted C. MacRae

Ted C. MacRae is a research entomologist by vocation and beetle taxonomist by avocation. Areas of expertise in the latter include worldwide jewel beetles (Buprestidae) and North American longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae). More recent work has focused on North American tiger beetles (Cicindelidae) and their distribution, ecology, and conservation.
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2 Responses to Seminar on Oklahoma’s Glass Mountains

  1. D. Christopher Rogers says:

    Thanks, Ted!

    Neat stuff. Some questions about the Amblycheila: In western Kansas: I do not find them on slopes, as yours were. Have you found them elsewhere on slopes? What time of year were you finding the adults vs. the larvae?

    Christopher

    • I did not find mine on slopes either—at most the ground was gently sloped. I’ve only seen adults once in early July. Larvae, on the other hand, I’ve been able to find each time I’ve visited the area (I’ve been there in June, July and September).

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