Brazil Bugs #8 – Desafio de identificação #4

It’s time for a new ID Challenge, this one from my recent trip to Brazil.  I don’t expect this to be a terribly difficult challenge, so whoever wins is going to do so by gaining bonus points for providing detail about what is shown here in addition to correct taxonomic assignments.

See ID Challenge #2 for a detailed explanation of the rules

Copyright © Ted C. MacRae

About Ted C. MacRae

Ted C. MacRae is a research entomologist by vocation and beetle taxonomist by avocation. Areas of expertise in the latter include worldwide jewel beetles (Buprestidae) and North American longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae). More recent work has focused on North American tiger beetles (Cicindelidae) and their distribution, ecology, and conservation.
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14 Responses to Brazil Bugs #8 – Desafio de identificação #4

  1. TGIQ says:

    Order: Hemiptera
    Suborder: Auchenorrhyncha
    Family: Aetalionidae
    Genus: Aetalion
    Species: reticulatum

    The individual pictured here is a female and she is guarding her egg mass. Females lay clutches of up to 100 eggs, which are covered in a viscous secretion.

  2. Hi Ted. Firstly apologies – we have much more mundane insects here in the UK so I’m going to pass on your id challenge. Great blog, however.

    I wonder if you’d be willing to add my blog to your ‘Insects & inverts’ links? I’m involved with running a 3 year project in the UK called Plants for Bugs. We’re essentially looking at the influence of different planting shemes (from British natives to exotics) on invertebrates. If you’d care to take a look at our webpages and my blog, I’d welcome some feedback – visit http://www.rhs.org.uk/plants4bugs

    Thanks, Helen

    • Hi Helen. The sidebar links are reserved for blogs, but I’m happy to give your project a tip of the hat. Nice to see folks giving insects and invertebrates serious attention in wildlife gardening.

  3. nellie says:

    I have quickly identified the object of this photo. It is a tiny stain glass window. The piece of art must have been dropped in the Brazilian forest. Note the delicate insertion of rubies at one end of the piece along with the beautiful choice of amber and onyx on the leg-like appendages. It is a wonderful specimen which has brought you, the finder, unmeasurable wealth.
    nellie

    • The wings really do look like stained glass windows.
      2 pts for making me smile this morning🙂

      • nellie says:

        Ted, Thanks for stopping by my blogs, especially the waverlytotahoe.blogspot.com blog. I plan on writing as soon as I get to go somewhere. For that to happen, my husband needs some time off again. He retired then took a short-term job that is still happening. All this snowy weather keeps me thinking of somewhere warm but It seems like we might have to leave USA to find that. I’m learning some things from your blog.
        nellie

        • Thanks, nellie – I’m enjoying reading about your travels through some of the same areas than have enamored me over the past few years. Glad you’re finding something of interest here as well.

  4. Oops, sorry Ted. I should have made clear – I do have a blog (called Plants for Bugs) which can be viewed at http://mygarden.rhs.org.uk/blogs/science__advice/default.aspx

    Regards, Helen

  5. Ben Coulter says:

    I don’t have too much time, and I fear I won’t do very well on this one. I did find one other image of this species with Google, from the same region, but it was unidentified. So…

    Homoptera, Membracidae.

    It’s a female, and she appears to have just oviposited in the stem. She is depositing a coating of foam over the oviposition site which will harden to protect the eggs.

  6. tceisele says:

    I’d say it’s some kind of leafhopper (family Cicadellidae), and as for what it’s doing, it looks like it is standing on a mass of some sort, so I’ll say it is either laying or guarding eggs.

    And the blemishes on the plant stem could be spots where it either fed, or injected eggs.

    • Not a leafhopper (though it certainly looks like one). However, it is guarding its egg mass, so 2 pts for that.

      You’ll get partial credit for implying the order (Hemiptera) with your family choice but not actually stating it, so your total for this challenge is 3 pts.

  7. Pingback: Treehoppers from Brazil | What's That Bug?

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