Newest Blog Carnival: House of Herps

Invertebrates?  Check.
Moths?  Check.
Plants?  Check.
Trees?  Check.
Birds?  Check.
Marine life?  Check.
Reptiles and amphibians?… Um… Er…

Despite their popularity, charisma, and status as icons for global conservation, reptiles and amphibians have not enjoyed the same attention by blog carnivals that insects, birds, plants, and even ideas (e.g., evolution) have received.  House of Herps is about to change all that.  The brainchild of Amber Coakley and Jason Hogle, this newest of blog carnivals will fill the void in celebration of all things herpetological.  The inaugural issue is scheduled for the middle of this month, so here’s your chance to be a founding contributor:

So if you love herps—if you photograph them, write about them, sketch or paint artwork based on them, study them, or just happen to see one that you mention on your blog—we want to hear from you for House of Herps #1 coming in mid-December. We also want to hear from you if you’re interested in hosting the carnival.  Please visit the House of Herps site for contact information or send your submission links to us at submissions [at] houseofherps.com.

Submissions for the first issue are due by December 15, but if you miss the deadline don’t despair—I’ll be hosting HoH #2 in January 2010.

Hmm, this gives me an idea.  Moths have their own carnival, why not beetles?  After all, they are far and away the most diverse ordinal taxon on earth (22% of all described life forms are beetles).  What do you think?  Coleo-Carnival?  In Celebration of Elytra?  An Inordinate Fondness?  Beetle Bacchanal?

Copyright © Ted C. MacRae

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About Ted C. MacRae

Ted C. MacRae is a research entomologist by vocation and beetle taxonomist by avocation. Areas of expertise in the latter include worldwide jewel beetles (Buprestidae) and North American longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae). More recent work has focused on North American tiger beetles (Cicindelidae) and their distribution, ecology, and conservation.
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19 Responses to Newest Blog Carnival: House of Herps

  1. Seabrooke says:

    I was pleased to hear about the new herp carnival, even though I won’t be submitting much until April. I gather you had an influencing hand in its creation.🙂

    I’m all for a beetle carnival! As you point out, one-fifth of life is beetles. Everybody has a beetle post. Even in the winter I have beetle posts: weevils invading the birdseed, lady beetles on the windows, larder beetles in the cat food. The great thing is, if you send it roaming there’s very little investment required of you beyond that initial setup.🙂

    • Hi Seabrooke. Yes, I was also pleased when I heard what Amber and Jason were up to. My influence in its creation was minimal – basically I told Amber that “a herp carnival would be great” and stumbled onto a name that she liked.

      I’ve been thinking of a beetle carnival for some time now, really ever since you came up with Moth and Me. It would have to be of the roaming variety, and I’m not daunted by the thought of setting it up (no idea how to do it, but I’m sure people like you and Amber would be more than willing to give me some coaching ;)). I guess if beetles are going to have their own carnival, I’m as good a choice as anybody to start one (because, as we all know, I just don’t have enough to do :D).

      • Seabrooke says:

        Well, you know what they say: if you want something done, give it to a busy person. Or an alternative, in this case, if you want something done (right) sometimes you just gotta do it yourself.🙂

        As Jason says, they’re all niche carnivals, really. I’m not sure how carnivals like the marine or desert ones do for submissions. At least the beetles are found around the world and are out and about during the day so they tend to get more casual interest. Fortunately, the blogosphere is so huge it’s not hard finding posts, even if you only get a handful of active contributors at first.

        As Jason also says, don’t hesitate to pepper us with questions if you need! I’m always happy to help. You can also sign me up to host at some point. Oh, and my vote’s also for Beetle Bacchanal/ia.🙂 (seems the ia is the pluralization of singular bacchanal)

  2. jason says:

    Let me say again: Thank you for your support, Ted! It’s very much appreciated.

    Your clever wit continues to put a smile on my face. You effortlessly tossed out multiple name ideas for the herp carnival, and here you’ve done it again–delightfully so! Personally, I like “Beetle Bacchanal”–though “Beetle Bacchanalia” has a nice swing on the end (to shamelessly bastardize your idea). I’m with Seabrooke: I’m all for a beetle carnival. Why not? (Truth in advertising: I just love to celebrate nature, so maybe I’m not a good indicator here.)

    • Hi Jason – thank you for taking the idea and running with it, and I’m happy my small contribution was useful.

      You know, it’s funny – I almost wrote it as “Beetle Bacchanalia”, but then I wasn’t sure “bacchanalia” was really a word. Your comment seems to swing opinion decidedly in that direction now.

      I have no idea if a beetle carnival would be anything more than a niche carnival, but even it that turns out the be the case I’ll be fine with it. You may need to soon start anticipating pestiferous “How do I…” emails🙂

      • jason says:

        Ultimately they’re all niche carnivals. Most naturalists have their likes and their dislikes, their foci and their…well…um…their unfoci (gee, I love making up words–I hear tell it’s a cardinal sin for serious writers but it’s one I indulge in nonetheless).

        Neither pestiferous nor pestilential. Truth be told, I’m always honored when you ask me something–though I suspect you give me more credit than I’m due. I’d love to help if you want to pursue the idea. And I will definitely participate and host (so, as Seabrooke pointed out, you can set it free and let it wander sans worry).

  3. Michael says:

    Love it — Beetle Bacchanal!

  4. ajbroome says:

    I like “An Inordinate Fondness” although “Beetle Bacchanalia” is also good.

    I will be watching “House of Herps”.

    Andrew in NZ.

  5. Mike says:

    I can’t imagine a more apt name than An Inordinate Fondness for a beetle carnival!

  6. Michael Sundberg says:

    Thanks for posting this info, I have some good herp pictures I will gladly submit.

  7. By the way, I hope I haven’t implied that the potential names I rattled off above are final choices. I’m really just trying to gauge interest in the idea of a beetle carnival to begin with. If there is sufficient interest and I decide to go forward, I am open to any and all name suggestions.

    Elytral Euphoria? Beetle Ball? Coleop-tribute?

    Others?

  8. I like Inordinate Fondness or Beetle Bacchanalia. The later more than the former, though, since I don’t often get to use the word “bacchanalia” in day-to-day conversations.

  9. Hi Ted, I’m a bit late to this post, but I’m so glad that An Inordinate Fondness is becoming a reality. I can tell you from my current efforts on House of Herps that the work is very rewarding. The enthusiasm from nature bloggers is infectious. Congrats!

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