Author Archives: Ted C. MacRae

About Ted C. MacRae

Ted C. MacRae is a research entomologist by vocation and beetle taxonomist by avocation. Areas of expertise in the latter include worldwide jewel beetles (Buprestidae) and North American longhorned beetles (Cerambycidae). More recent work has focused on North American tiger beetles (Cicindelidae) and their distribution, ecology, and conservation.

Big, black (and red), and beautiful!

While I may have already declared Plinthocoelium suaveolens (bumelia borer) as North America’s most beautiful longhorned beetle, any short list of top candidates for this title must also include the species Crossidius coralinus. Like most other members of this strictly North American genus, these gorgeous beetles … Continue reading

Posted in Cerambycidae, Coleoptera | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

When is a stag beetle not a stag beetle?

A: When it’s a longhorned beetle! Last week I traveled to northwestern Tennessee to visit research plots, and on the way back I took the opportunity to stop by Fort Defiance Park near Cairo, Illinois. Fort Defiance represents the southernmost tip … Continue reading

Posted in Cerambycidae, Coleoptera | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

ID Challenge #23

This is a straight up identification challenge. Can you identify the order (duh!), family, genus, and species? Total body length of the subject is ~20 mm. Answers revealed in a couple of days or so, with comments moderated until that … Continue reading

Posted in [No taxon] | Tagged , | 11 Comments

One-shot Wednesday: Mallodon dasystomus

Today’s (slightly belated) edition of “One-shot Wednesday” features a beetle that I saw just about this time last year while blacklighting along the Mississippi River in the southeastern lowlands of Missouri. Mallodon dasystomus¹ is a prionid longhorned beetle (family Cerambycidae, subfamily Prioninae) that … Continue reading

Posted in Cerambycidae, Coleoptera | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Black is beautiful!

Most species in the genus Crossidius exhibit varying amounts of yellow/red/orange coloration on the body. However, one species—Crossidius ater—dispenses with such adornments and remains all-black throughout its expansive range across the Great Basin and surrounding areas. Despite this, they are … Continue reading

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Why I went to Georgia

Call me biased, but for my money few groups of beetles can match the maddening combination of beauty and difficult taxonomy of jewel beetles (family Buprestidae) (I can already hear the protestations of weevil and scarab workers). In the case of … Continue reading

Posted in Buprestidae, Coleoptera | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Who likes mole crickets?

On a recent collecting trip to southeastern Georgia, we spent the night in Swainsboro. We found a hotel and went to the restaurant across the street for dinner. It was dark by the time we got back to the hotel, and since … Continue reading

Posted in Gryllotalpidae, Orthoptera | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Turbo Testudine

Last weekend I traveled to Georgia with two field companions to look for insects associated with sand scrub habitats in the southeastern part of the state. Of course, while I am an entomologist with beetles as a focus, I am also a naturalist who keeps … Continue reading

Posted in Reptilia, Vertebrata | Tagged , , , , | 7 Comments